Serenity

 

Serenity is a practice in mindfulness. It requires focus, contemplation and practice. A contemplative room should also be serene and simple, the use of furniture and decor, minimal. Peace needs space to breathe and as such, requires many empty spaces, an openess, a cleanliness and a quietness. There are few things that are as peaceful as sitting comfortably, perhaps quietly, in a space allowing the eyes to wander lazily across a room of soothing colors, comfortable furnishings and calming lighting. The addition of soothing sounds, music and fresh air can enhance the experience and lift the spirit to another level.

 

People have varying sensitivities to their interior environment. Some people are more comfortable with aesthetic simplicity than others. For some it is a preference, for others, it can be a necessity or completely insignificant.

Like most things in life, creating a peaceful space is a journey. It is a path that leads from the outside in – from an exterior space of peace to an inner peace.  I know because I have been on the path for the past 12 years. For those interested in pursuing this path, some ways to begin include “downsizing your stuff”, eliminating debt, ridding your interior environment of clutter, objects and people that “weigh you down”. It means managing your emotions, your thoughts and your mindfulness in order to eliminate the toxic effect of people and circumstances in your life.

It is not to be taken lightly, for it can transform you in ways not imagined.  It has therapeutic value, an element of happiness and occasional bliss. Within it, you may find compassion and tolerance, some balance and occasional harmony with all that resonates around you.

There will be noise. There will be chaos. The senses will be soothed, stimulated, assaulted and nurtured. A different, and emerging peaceful you, will respond objectively in each situation limiting the length of time it takes to recuperate from a negative experience, or detach from an unhealthy or toxic situation.  You will meet each intrusion with indifference, each annoyance with detachment.